About your Search

20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
. at the university of pennsylvania today to talk to her about this book. the nets is commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> is started in 1957. president eisenhower had had a lot of discussions with the secretary of state about the way the united states was seen around the world because of a lot of the racism that was going on and people here about and read about. the fact that this seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening and whether it was launching or some kind of discrimination that was taking place in the country so that the idea was eisenhower said that he was going to ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission which would put the facts on top of the table. i am told by one of the people who was at the meeting that he sent the table and said another going to put the facts on top of the table. and commissions, as we know, who do policy sometimes set up because their is a tough problem and people don't want to do anything about it. this set up a commission
written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
commission on civil rights set up by president eisenhower in 1857. this is about half an hour. >> on your screen now is a well-known face for c-span viewers. that's mary frances berry, professor at the university of pennsylvania and also the author several books. with university of pennsylvania today to chat to her about this book, "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" . mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rights missions started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, but the way the united states is in or on the road because of the racism going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seem to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether it is one chain or some discrimination taking place in the country said the idea was that eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to save the civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told
news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm doing the research, with hall, look what he is doing here. i try, i don't say i succeeded by try to explain that in my books. it gives a true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. because you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand tim
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
that is powerful and does show up among civil rights activists. the more i looked a connection with russia nuia it is more widespread. think of rosa parks they all had garvey connections. there is a picture of african-american in politics that is much more complicated than we want to acknowledge. we have come to terms with our past by constructing a narrative about house slavery ends and freedom is ultimately realized so the civil-rights movement becomes the crucial and point*. and episodes, a people's movements that don't fit into better very problematic. also the scholars across the political spectrum who have an investment to deny it to. i had a lot of push back of anything i have written written, that part of what i discovered, the movement is still alive, there is a chapter in philadelphia, i organized a conference three years ago, a scholarly conference on nuia but at the last minute i advertise it in the local newspaper and 150 garvey-ites showed up. >> host: what is the garvey-ites political focus? >> guest: nuia, there are some chapters, the one in philadelphia, some in the united stat
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
of the civil right lawyer. tell me about your book. >> guest: my book is a collective pieing agraph of six african-american civil rights lawyers who practiced law during the era of segregation and it's about their struggles with civil rights and racial identity. at it about the fact that to be an african-american civil rights lawyer in this era, argue in the book, is to be caught between the black and who it world. both blacks and whites want things of these lawyers and identify with these lawyers. so, to be this kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him, was not just an african-american lawyer but member caught between the black and white world. >> host: how difficult for an african-american to become a lawyer at that time. >> guest: it's not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to good to law school like everybody everybody else, which does cost money, but it's difficult to be a lawyer because no african-american lawyer in this period is going to have white clients or very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have money and if you have money and yo
you very much. >> thank you. >> now the daughter of civil rights leaders martin luther king jr. and st. john's scott king desert rose in the life and legacy of coretta space king. she talks with books of america the publishers' trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice, who was scott bagley? >> well the sister of coretta scott king. >> and your mother. >> yes, my mother, so my aunt. he and my mother grew up in alabama together obviously and she later became a john notte professor. she founded the university in pennsylvania. so, a very lively woman. and unfortunately passed last year in june after completing the book. >> so this book is desert rose, the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt. when did she write this book? >> welcome it was a journey that began with my mother's request to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threatened she was confirmed she wouldn't be lost and wanted people to know she wasn't just the life of martin luther king jr. and mother of children but the role in the movement and very much an a
you drag us back? about free civil-rights america. are we different now? is put in what way? had recanted you to push ourselves as exclusive as we can? but listening not just talking. but the atf to live to the other person's shoes. but use of portion of the five. that is what produce the first black president there browning of the electorate that that fear and anxiety is legitimate and we all need to leave cognizant and listen to the side to find the common ground to where we can feel good to what is possible. especially collectivity. >> host: what you teach? >> guest: i am a filmmaker so right now we focus on graduate courses that films can be a medium for scholarship. for those that write these books but if you make a film then everybody would see the project. that is the incentives but it might allow you if you use film to tell a story it might allow you to say different things about the world. but a visual dissertation to think about producing knowledge these images and sound account as scholarship the way a journal article would count not just the public scholarship. we do
very much. >> now bernice king the daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king jr. and coretta scott king discusses the recently published biography of her mother. desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king. she talked with booktv at bookexpo america publishing's annual trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice king who is edith scott dagley? >> guest: at edith scott bickley -- coretta scott king was the wife of martin luther king jr. -- cohost land your mother. >> guest: yes my mother so she was my aunt. she and my mother grew up in alabama together and she later became a drama professor. in fact she founded the drama department at the state university. she was a very lively woman and unfortunately passed last year in june. after completing this book. >> this book is desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt eva scott dagley? when did she write this book lacks. >> guest: well it was a journey that began with my mother's requested 1966 to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threaten
tarheel. and the civil rights movement at that time was working towards getting a public accommodations law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they can enjoy the same freedoms that in some manner they take for granted often today to be able to go into a lunch counter or wherever. >> host: so 1961-1964, and i'm guessing you can speak to the majority of these and you can recall the moment? we're looking at this one right here, group of folks in front of a merchant
there was a woman at the "washington post" i knew well who was taken off the prized civil-rights assignment at the post because the people that were involved in this civil rights protest were going to have meetings here at the press club and because women were not allowed in the press club they were complaining about this and said we will find a man for this. that's the way things work to the estimate was your beat the "washington post"? >> i have a variety of beads at the washington post. i covered the suburbs in the city of alexandria and covered the course general sessions that was now the superior court and i covered welfare and i covered education, the d.c. public schools. i was on the metro staff. >> totally were you a reporter for the post that the university of maryland following the field for a long time. what is the difference now for the female reporters in the 1960's and 70's? >> there is a difference of course. i still at the university of maryland. i am a graduate director of the college of journalism. we men have many more opportunities now than man but i still think it's har
right into this. decades after the civil war ended, katherine stone, who we see on the screen, published her memoirs of what she called the gay busy life. that she and her wealthy slave-owning family had led on their 1200-acre plantation in prewar louisiana. the members of her family, she recalled, -- her words -- there was always something going on. formal dining, spend the days, evening parties, riding frolics, fox hunts, and to assist with these and other diversions, katherine added her family had -- again, her words -- quite a corps of servants to keep us well waited on since, naturally, no one expected to wait on himself. katherine stone's younger brothers also -- again her words -- owned a little darky in the quarters who eventually become his body servant. and to generate the wealth that sustained the stone family's life of, again, her words -- luxurious ease, some 150 enslaved human beings toiled in the plantation's cotton and cane field, six days a week, week after week, month after month, year after year. the civil war's outbreak in april of 1861 signaled the beginning of the e
, of interest. it's even a science fiction story. because what we're dealing here really when you come right down to it is the meeting of two alien civilizations after 70 years of the soviet period. the oil industry in particular grew up in almost complete isolation from the west, and this is virtually a unique case. we have other places where oil industries have grown up, where oil industries are run by national oil companies, but in almost every case -- in fact in every case -- these industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 1920s on at any rate or for all practical purposes the oil industry was home grown and developed its own culture, its own civilization even as the soviet union did with its own language and its own culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that of a people who decided that capitalism didn't work, so it's as though they all piled into a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a completely different civilization
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)